Winter Olympic sponsors, feeling the heat

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My latest story for Guardian Sustainable Business looks at the pressures from LGBT (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender) activists being brought to bear on big American companies that are sponsoring the Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, in February.

Interestingly, some of the companies–my story cites Coca-Cola as an example–are otherwise known as being gay-friendly. But although they support equality for their own workers, they are being asked to speak out more widely and publicly against the discrimination that LGBT people face in Russia and elsewhere.

Here’s how the story begins:

On the issue of gay rights, The Coca-Cola Co has a sparkling record. The company has recorded a perfect score on the Human Rights Campaign’s Corporate Equality Index since the index launched in 2006. Coca-Cola was one of the first US companies to support the proposed Employment Non-Discrimination Act , which would protect employees from discrimination due to sexual orientation, and its HR department has funded a lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) employees association since 2000.

Despite all that, protesters gathered earlier this month beneath a Coke billboard in New York’s Times Square, pouring cans of Coke into a sewer and carrying banners reading: “Coke: Don’t Sponsor Hate.”

The problem, of course, is that Coca-Cola is a sponsor of the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi, Russia, which has been a target for gay activists since the Russian government enacted a draconian anti-gay law in July. Other Olympic sponsors, including McDonald’sGeneral Electric,Procter & GambleVisaSamsung and Dow, also are feeling pressure.

The controversy is the latest evidence that even companies that have done their level best to meet society’s expectations – around sexual orientation, or factory conditions in poor countries, or climate change, or any other headline-generating issue – can be caught unaware as expectations ratchet up. And expectations always seem to be ratcheting up.

You can read the rest here. My own view is that if the corporate sponsors are going to benefit from their association with the Olympics, and they are, they ought to at the very minimum publicly push the International Olympic Committee and the Russian hosts to be very clear that LGBT athletes, spectators and sponsors will not face any discrimination. That’s the least they can do. Whether they should also be expected to support LGBT activist groups in Russia and elsewhere in the world–that’s one of the requests from the Human Rights Campaign, America’s biggest gay-rights group–is a trickier question. But if you see gay rights as a civil rights issue, as I do, then it’s reasonable to ask that influential companies to be public about where they stand.

Comments

  1. Perhaps this is an issue which should have been addressed by the International Olympic Committee before it agreed to allow Russia to host the Olympics.

    Let us all hope that the Olympics are never allowed to be hosted by an Islamic nation.

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