Peak suburbs

The End of the Suburbs Book Cover(2)I grew up in the suburbs (Croton-on-Hudson, NY), and raised my children in suburbs (Grosse Pointe Park, MI, and Bethesda, MD) and so, obviously, I’m among those who believe that there’s lots to like about suburbs: spacious homes, good schools, safe neighborhoods, lawns, at least when you don’t have to mow them.

But as I read Leigh Gallagher’s terrific new book, The End of the Suburbs, which argues that suburbs, and particularly newer suburbs, are in decline, I felt like cheering.

In the book, Leigh, who is a colleague of mine at Fortune, argues persuasively that social, economic and demographic forces are converging to end a half-century of suburban growth in the US. Young people seem to prefer cities. Energy prices are rising. People have come to hate long commutes. Some like to walk or bike. Hurray!

Since finishing the book a couple of weeks ago, I’ve come across more evidence here and there that Leigh is onto something. Take, for example, this New York Times story about how water scarcity in southwest cities like Phoenix and Los Angeles have prompted local governments to pay people to get rid of their lawns. Lawns–like so much else in the suburbs–are incredibly wasteful.

I interviewed Leigh by email for a story about “peak suburbs” and what they mean for sustainability in Guardian Sustainable Business.  Here’s how it begins:

Have we reached “peak suburbs”? In her new book, The End of the Suburbs, Fortune magazine editor Leigh Gallagher argues that powerful social, economic, environmental and demographic forces are converging to end a half-century of suburban growth in the US.

This is good news for those who believe that the US economy must become more sustainable, and that big houses, big cars and big commutes are wasteful. “No other country has such an enormous percentage of its middle class living at such low densities across such massive amounts of land,” Leigh writes. Acerbic critic and author James Howard Kunstler, who’s interviewed in the book, more bluntly calls suburbia “the greatest misallocation of resources in the history of the world.”

leigh_gallagher

Leigh Gallagher

But if cul-de-sac living is approaching a dead end, what’s next? And what opportunities for more sustainable businesses will arise as the suburbs decline? Those are among the questions I put to Leigh in this Q&A.

Let’s start with the basics. Why are suburbs in decline? Are rising energy prices – or, dare we say it, concern about the environment – playing a role?

You can read Leigh’s answers here. Better yet, read the book.

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